Contradiction

Contradiction Front CoverContradiction by Michael Boer
ISBN: 978-1-6886-0817-7

Available now.

Find it via Amazon.com (where you can Look Inside for a free preview): https://www.amazon.com/dp/1688608176

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Reading a poem makes a performer of you. You cast your own voices for the writer’s first- and third-person characters, deciding, almost unthinkingly, whether the writer’s second-person is yourself or someone else. Not always effortlessly, you sort out the scenes, images, sequences, quotations, and metaphors. You evaluate each of the writer’s assertions, accepting them into or rejecting them from the framework of your own thoughts. Poetry is a kind of source code, requiring little math but rich in context, grammar, and logical subroutines, which your mind may assemble into the mesh of your own library of eclectic grammar, logic, and contradictions.

Your reading is thus uniquely your own collaboration with the writer.

Bono Prayer Breakfast

Thursday night, after finding a re-run on this week’s Boondocks tape, I flipped channels over to C-SPAN just in time for a re-play of that morning’s National Prayer Breakfast at the Washington Hilton. And just as I was about to shut THAT off, Bono comes on. Right there, with the Prez and First Lady on his right and Senators Pryor, Coleman, and Obama on his left, and an audience full of politicians and world leaders, Bono says, “Please join me in praying that I don

It’s a wonder that we still know how to breathe

A friend invited me to attend a presentation at the University of Washington last night (February 20) by an “unembedded American journaist in Iraq,” Dahr Jamail, who talked, showed photos and videos, and made his case that the on-going “seige” of Falluja is a war crime comparable to the bombing of Dresden. Some of this is probably not news to you, but I’ll summarize his perspective, and you can visit his website if you want more of his reporting.

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